The temperature is starting to rise.

It will probably be a while before the Greeks recover from the shock of Eurovision but at least here on Symi everyone has the distraction of the season to take their minds off the fact that the Vikings stormed out of the frozen north and swept the boards. Bring back Sibelius. Actually, when Lordi was interviewed on Greek television they seemed as stunned as everyone else!

The temperature is starting to rise and the nights are becoming warmer. Not that long ago I was cooking the evening meal on the cast iron wood stove in the kitchen. Now I am still cooking on wood, but it is in the old fire-pit outside, in the shelter of the rosemary bushes. It is an aromatic outdoor kitchen with not just rosemary but also oregano, thyme and lemons within easy reach. What more does one need?

Most of us have packed away our duvets and blankets, mothballed until November, and are shaking out the mosquito nets. Our office is still pleasantly cool with the breeze coming off the water but out in the sun the temperature is around 30 degrees centigrade at midday and everyone who has been in to see us this morning has been dressed in shorts, sarongs and the like. By the way, speaking of visitors, for those who know her from the chat page, Mille and family arrived safely on this morning's Aegli and are settling in up in Chorio.



It is time for another view of the Pedi valley, this time taken from above the old football pitch, soon to be the site of the new sports centre for the island's youngsters. In the distance, if you look carefully, you will be able to see the sails of a large yacht creaming past the entrance to Pedi bay. Here in the harbour the gulets are just starting to come in for the day and a big three masted Turkish schooner has tied up outside the sponge shop. As the price of fuel continues to rise more and more of the gulets and caiques are improving their sailing rigs and using their booms for something other than holding up the sunshade. It used to be quite rare to see any of these vessels properly rigged but now this is the norm. It will be interesting to see if it affects the number of megayachts that pass through Symi this summer - will the rich and famous switch to eco-friendly sail power, or will they continue to convert fuel into noise by the barrelful?

Have a good week.

Regards,
Adriana
www.symivisitor.com

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About this Blog

I sailed into Panormitis Bay, Symi, by chance one windy July day in 1993 and have been here ever since. The locals tell me that this is one of the miracles of St Michael of Panormitis. A BA graduate with majors in English, Philosophy and Classical Civilisation, the idea of living in what is to all intents and purposes an archaeological site appeals to me. Not as small as Kastellorizo, not as touristy as Rhodes, Symi is just the right size. I live on a small holding which my husband and I have reclaimed from a ruin of over-grazing and neglect and turned into a small oasis over the course of the past 22 years. I also work part-time for Symi Visitor Accommodation, helping independent travellers discover and enjoy Symi's simple pleasures for themselves.

This page is kindly sponsored by Wendy Wilcox, Symi Visitor Accommodation.


Adriana Shum

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